Eastern Bloc


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Eastern Bloc is an exhibition and arts production centre dedicated to New Media and interdisciplinary art. The vision at Eastern Bloc is to explore and push the creative boundaries in digital and electronic arts, audio/video installation, multimedia performance and other emerging practices.

Eastern Bloc est un centre de production et d’exposition voué à la promotion des nouveaux médias et des arts interdisciplinaires, soutenant particulièrement l’exploitation créatrice dans les domaines des arts numériques, électroniques et audio/visuels, de la performance multi-médias et autres pratiques émergentes.

Erin Gee | Swarming Emotional Pianos
Winter 2014 Residency
Residency | 27 January - 23 March 2014
Presentation of work | 27 - 30 March 2014
Vernissage | 27 March 2014, 6pm - 9pm
Photos | J. Guzzo Desforges

#erin gee #eastern bloc #montreal #new media art #digital art #electronic art

Data : Salon III

26 February 2014

Peter Redecopp | Assemblances

Monika Berenyl | American Document

Photos: J. Guzzo Desforges 

#eastern bloc #montreal #new media art #digital art #electronic art #data salon

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Saturday, 1 February 2014, 12pm - 6pm 
Eastern Bloc Lab

Photos | Michael

#artandfeminism 

More information here: artandfeminism.tumblr.com

#artandfeminism #Eastern Bloc #Montreal #new media art #digital art #electronic art
Sahar Kubba | Hors Signal / Unsignal 
Fall 2013 Residency
Residency | 16 September - 3 November 2013
Presentation of work | 7 - 10 November 2013
Vernissage | 7 November 2013, 6pm - 9pm
Photos | Emily Gan
#Sahar Kubba #Eastern Bloc #Montreal #new media art #digital art #electronic art
TrailMix
16 January - 12 February, 2014
Alice Jarry and Christian Pelletier | v2_Récurrences
Jan Hostettler | Chalk Circle
Andrea Campbell | Transaction Trails 
 
Photos | J. Guzzo Desforges
#TrailMix #Eastern Bloc #Montreal #new media art #digital art #electronic art #art numerique

Data : Salon I

23 October 2013

Myriam Bleau | Photomaton

Caroline Blais | Domestic Memorabilia

Photos: J. Guzzo Desforges

#eastern bloc #montreal #new media art #electronic art #digital art #data salon

*~._.:*jEnNiFeR X JeNniFeR*:.~

19 September - 16 October, 2013

Jennifer Chan

P.A.U.L | Young Money | *A Total Jizzfest* | Boyfriend | Tristan | Nicholas

Jennifer Cherniack

The Hottest Hacker Chicks in Internet History and Other Cyber Girls | The Most Common Passwords in 1995 According to the Movie Hackers | The Most Common Passwords in 2012 According to the Internet | Cyber Chick Code | My Main Frame | For Roger

#Jennifer Chan #Jennifer Cherniack #Eastern Bloc #Montreal #new media art #digital art #electronic art
artandsciencejournal:

Hello, Stranger
Our identities shape us. Even our physical features can give away a lot of information about ourselves, such as, our level of vanity, how often we sleep, how often we exercise, and so on.
But what about a strand of our hair, or the gum we just chewed? Apparently, these insignificant little pieces can also give away a substantial amount of information about ourselves. Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates 3D recreations of people’s faces, using DNA she finds on…old chewing gum and cigarette butts. It is incredible to think that these pieces of garbage, after a few moments in contact with our DNA, can still hold onto our genetic makeup, and then even recreate, albeit not an exact likeness, of ourselves. Almost as if the gum that you just spit out isn’t really gum, but a piece of flesh.
But more importantly; how is this even possible? The artist explains that while in her lab, she puts the DNA through a process called PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), which helps her to study specific areas of our genomes, called Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. After extracting the necessary amount of data, she sends it off to a specialist lab, where strands of DNA are created from the aforementioned pieces of information. These strands of DNA are then fed into a 3D printing program, ready for printing!
There are still some things that the DNA-infested pieces of gum and cigarettes cannot tell us, such as the age of the anonymous person (she casts each model as a 25 year old), but it’s still chilling to see the portraits, wondering if you’ll stumble upon a neighbour, or friend.
Or maybe these portraits are truly anonymous, and aren’t even representations of real people; merely the artists own creations in a lab, like a biological puzzle.
-Anna Paluch

Sight & Sound 5 artist and member of Future Archaeology, Heather Dewey-Hagborg.

artandsciencejournal:

Hello, Stranger

Our identities shape us. Even our physical features can give away a lot of information about ourselves, such as, our level of vanity, how often we sleep, how often we exercise, and so on.

But what about a strand of our hair, or the gum we just chewed? Apparently, these insignificant little pieces can also give away a substantial amount of information about ourselves. Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates 3D recreations of people’s faces, using DNA she finds on…old chewing gum and cigarette butts. It is incredible to think that these pieces of garbage, after a few moments in contact with our DNA, can still hold onto our genetic makeup, and then even recreate, albeit not an exact likeness, of ourselves. Almost as if the gum that you just spit out isn’t really gum, but a piece of flesh.

But more importantly; how is this even possible? The artist explains that while in her lab, she puts the DNA through a process called PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), which helps her to study specific areas of our genomes, called Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. After extracting the necessary amount of data, she sends it off to a specialist lab, where strands of DNA are created from the aforementioned pieces of information. These strands of DNA are then fed into a 3D printing program, ready for printing!

There are still some things that the DNA-infested pieces of gum and cigarettes cannot tell us, such as the age of the anonymous person (she casts each model as a 25 year old), but it’s still chilling to see the portraits, wondering if you’ll stumble upon a neighbour, or friend.

Or maybe these portraits are truly anonymous, and aren’t even representations of real people; merely the artists own creations in a lab, like a biological puzzle.

-Anna Paluch

Sight & Sound 5 artist and member of Future Archaeology, Heather Dewey-Hagborg.

#Eastern Bloc #Montreal #Sight & Sound #Heather Dewey-Hagborg #new media art #digital art #electronic art

Data: Salon IV | April 24, 2013

Michael Palumbo - CrossTalk / Risa Dickens - Pass on

Guest curator: James Finnerty

Photos: Emily Gan

#Eastern Bloc #Montreal #Data: Salon #new media art #digital art #electronic art

Sight & Sound 5 Conferences | May 26, 2013 

Jennifer Chan, Vincent Chevalier, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Emilie Gervais, Michelle Lacombe - La performativité en réseau 

Photos: Guzzo Desforges

#Eastern Bloc #Montreal #Sight and Sound #Conferences #Jennifer Chan #Vincent Chevalier #Heather Dewey-Hagborg #Emilie Gervais #Michelle Lacombe #La performativité en réseau #new media art #electronic art #digital art

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